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A male perspective on wartime fashion in War Memorial Gallery

Wartime influences on male fashion will be the subject of a half-hour talk in the War Memorial Gallery on May 2 at 8pm. The talk will be followed by dance routines by the Belle Hoppers. The talk will be repeated at 1.15pm on May 3, 7, 8, 9 and 10.

The talk will be presented by Tadhg Morgan, who is a collector of wartime militaria and civilian costumes. He will examine the impact of age, social class, location, occupation and aspirations on wartime fashion and style by film stars such as Cary Grant and Clark Gable. His talk will be illustrated with clips from Pathé newsreels.

Tadhg Morgan

Tadhg Morgan in the War Memorial Gallery

There will be a special focus on military uniforms.

Window displays and show cases will contain period clothes, also two tone shoes, shaving brushes, Picture Post and much else.

Commenting on the talk, the Curator, Ciaran Elizabeth Doran said “The displays will demonstrate how, even before a soldier or a sailor had left home, the war effort was already influencing the clothing he wore.”

A Strictly Come Darning open workshop by our Education Officer and textile expert, Jenny Haslett, will be held on Wednesday May 8 at 11am. The public are invited to visit the gallery to practice darning, make a knitted bow tie or perhaps a wartime woollen rug. The workshop will be complemented by a running picture show and a display of some textiles from our collection.

The talk and workshop form part of the Cathedral Quarter Arts Festival. Admission free. All are welcome.

In an an excerpt of the Radio Ulster Good Morning Ulster programme  broadcast on 2nd May 2013 Helen Jones discusses the event with Tadhg Morgan and Curator Ciaran Elizabeth Doran.

A male perspective on wartime fashion in War Memorial Gallery

A male perspective on wartime fashion in War Memorial Gallery

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72nd anniversary of the blitz on Belfast

This gallery contains 8 photos.

A selection of images from the event at …

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Maps show how Nazis planned Belfast blitz

A map showing how Nazi Germany planned its 1941 bombing of Belfast has been put on display at the Northern Ireland War memorial.

The Ordnance Survey map used by Luftwaffe for the blitz was discovered in a German airfield at the end of the Second World War.

A Northern Ireland company had a copy in its archives and loaned it to the War Memorial to mark the 72nd anniversary of the bombing.

Around 900 people died and 1,500 were injured in the attack by 180 Luftwaffe bombers on the night of Easter Tuesday April 15.

The planes dropped 203 tonnes of bombs and 800 firebomb canisters on the city over several hours.

Yesterday the tragedy was marked by the laying of a wreath of flowers on the Blitz War Memorial in Belfast’s Talbot Street.

The ceremonial gesture was made by Lieutenant Colonel C T Hogg, chairman of the NI War Memorial, in front of a small gathering.

The map, which measures 110cms by 70cms, shows the clinical approach to the bombing of what the Luftwaffe concluded was “the most poorly defended city in the UK”.

Marked in red and purple are a range of targets, all noted down and translated into German.

These include ‘parliament and ministries’, ‘law courts’, ‘City Hall’, ‘shipyard – Harland and Wolff’, ‘gasworks’, ‘ropeworks’ and docks.

Less obvious targets identified are ‘Royal Academic Institution’ (better known as the grammar school ‘Inst’), a reservoir and a sweet factory.

The map will be on display for a month.

War Memorial curator Ciaran Elizabeth Doran, who worked for 25 years in London’s Imperial War Museum, said it is an “ordinary Ordnance Survey map” which was available to anyone before the war and fell somehow in to German hands.

“The map was found in Gatow airfield in Berlin by the RAF when they arrived in 1945,” she said.

“Scenic NI had it in their collection and there is not a copyright on it so it fitted in very well with today’s commemoration.

“If you look at it you can see that it really exposes the vulnerability of Belfast from this map on which areas are highlighted.

“It could have been picked up by anyone who had been going to Belfast on holiday.
“They added their own information to it with areas and buildings highlighted. They also marked railways and bridges.

“following the bombing in 1941, the devastation that was visited on a lot of these areas meant this map was the last view of Belfast as it was before the blitz.”

Reproduced from The Irish News, Tuesday April 16 2013. By Bimpe Archer.

Article from the Irish News, 'Maps show how Nazis planned Belfast blitz'

Article from the Irish News, 'Maps show how Nazis planned Belfast blitz'

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Horrific hit-list marks the blitz

Belfast’s War Memorial Gallery will shortly be displaying a vivid and extremely poignant memorial to the German Luftwaffe’s terrible blitz on Belfast in 1941.

During two major bombing raids and a third smaller attack, an estimated 1,000 people lost their lives as hundreds of tons of deadly explosives and countless thousands of incendiaries devastated the city’s streets, buildings and the shipyard quays.

Many homes, shops and manufacturing works around the Lagan were demolished and several ships were sunk. A copy of the original Ordnance Survey map used by Hitler’s air crews to target their lethal bombardment is on show in the gallery from April 15.
The Stadtplan von Belfast measures 110cm by 70cm and is overprinted with a German hit list of important targets. Outlined and highlighted in red marker pen on the faded, patched together document are the Luftwaffe’s principal objectives (Einzelobjekte) including the docks, railway stations, reservoirs and the Victoria Barracks.

German pilots and navigators, peering through their goggles at Stormont (Parlamentsgebäude undo Ministerien) and the City Hall (Stadthalle), must have wondered while they released their bombs on the shipyard (Werft von Harland and Wolff) how a German surname became associated with such a strategic enemy target! Did a finger pause momentarily on a bomb-release button?

Museum Curator Ciaran Elizabeth Doran told me: “The original map was found in Gatow airfield in Berlin by the RAF when they arrived there in 1945.”

From her wealth of local cartographical knowledge, Ciaran Elizabeth picked out a pickle factory near the Stranmillis roundabout.

The 72nd anniversary of the blitz will be marked by the laying of a wreath on the War Memorial in 21 Talbot Street (beside Belfast Cathedral) at 11am on Monday. Members of the public, and anyone with family memories of the blitz, are invited to attend the short ceremony, and to see the map which will be on view to the public for at least a month.

If readers have any memeories or passed-on accounts of the blitz that they’d like to share on Roamer’s page, please send them to the address below.

Reproduced from the Belfast Newsletter, Friday 12th of April 2013.

Belfast Newletter Article: Horrific hit-list marks the blitz

Belfast Newletter Article: Horrific hit-list marks the blitz

 

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Ordnance Survey map of Belfast

A copy of the Ordnance Survey map of Belfast used by the Luftwaffe for the blitz in 1941, will be on display to the public in the War Memorial Gallery from April 15.

The large map (110cm by 70cm) is overprinted in German. Outlined in red are the principle targets, including the docks, railway stations, reservoirs and Victoria Barracks.

Luftwaffe map of Belfast 1941

Luftwaffe map of Belfast 1941

Welcoming the latest acquisition, the Curator, Ciaran Elizabeth Doran, said:

‘‘The map was found in Gatow air field in Berlin by the RAF when they arrived in 1945.’’

The 72nd anniversary of the blitz on Belfast will be marked by the laying of a wreath of flowers on the Blitz War Memorial in 21 Talbot Street (beside Belfast Cathedral) at 11.00 am on Monday April 15. The wreath will be laid by Lieutenant Colonel C T Hogg, chairman of the NI War Memorial.

Members of the public, and anyone with family memories of the Easter Tuesday blitz, are invited to attend the ceremony.

The Curator was interviewed by Seamus McKee on the subject as part of the Radio Ulster  Evening Extra programme on 9th April 2013.

An excerpt of the Radio Ulster Evening Extra programme broadcast on 9th April 2013 features an interview with the Curator and Seamus McKee on this topic.

The map has been made available through Scenicni.

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Easter Closing

We are closed Friday 29th March, Monday the 1st of April and Tuesday 2nd April. The gallery will reopen on Wednesday the third of April at 10.30 am.

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Gallery Closed

The gallery will be closed on Monday 18th March 2013.

The gallery will  re open on Tuesday 19th March at 10.30.

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75th anniversary of the launch of HMS Belfast

The 75th anniversary of the launch of HMS Belfast was marked by a ceremony in the War Memorial Gallery on March 17. The cruiser was launched at Harland and Wolff on St Patricks Day 1938 by Mrs Chamberlain, the wife of the Prime Minister.

Present for the occasion were 24 members of the HMS Belfast Association from London. Welcoming the the visitors, the Chairman of the War Memorial, Lieutenant Colonel C T Hogg, said: “HMS Belfast was the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland. Her record of service to the nation is one of which the people of Northern Ireland are justly proud.”

The Chairman of the HMS Belfast Association, Mr Fred Wooding, laid a wreath on the war memorial in memory of the sailors who died while serving with the ship.

Presenting a ship’s plaque to mark the occasion, Mr Wooding said: “HMS Belfast has strong connections with Belfast, having been built at Harland and Wolff and adopting the city’s motto Pro Tanto Quid, Retribuamus.

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Ship’s bell from HMS Egilsay in War Memorial Gallery

B is for Bell

Ship’s bell from HMS Egilsay in War Memorial Gallery

An original ship’s bell is the latest addition to the collection at the War Memorial Gallery.  The bell belonged to HMS Egilsay, one of 118 Isles-class naval trawlers commissioned during the Second World War for minesweeping duties with the Royal Naval Patrol Service.  The ships took their names from islands in the Western Isles of Scotland.

HMS Egilsay was built at Hull and launched in 1942.  The trawler was used for minesweeping duties and harbour defence in the Mediterranean.  The vessel was sold to Italy in 1946 and scrapped on being decommissioned.

The bell has been loaned to the gallery by the Black family, whose father, Jim Black, served on the ship during WW2.  It is now on permanent display.

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See what our new Education Officer Jenny has been up to …

Northern Ireland War Memorial is working in partnership with the Belfast Education and Library Board Parent Support Programme to offer parent and child workshops in February, March and April 2013.

Participating groups visit our Home Front exhibition, inspect the weekly food rations and try on some World War II uniforms to learn about life in Northern Ireland during World War II.

Parent and child work together to learn how to make a wartime woollen rug with scraps of wool, taking a break to play some wartime board games in a fun and enjoyable session for both parent and child.

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