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Maisie and Ernest

Maisie and Ernest

While the American Servicemen based in Northern Ireland from 1942 where here to prepare for the invasion of North Africa and Europe, they had a huge social impact upon local people, not least amongst the local women.

Maisie Irene Black lived off the Beersbridge Rd, Belfast and Ernest Nickolette came from Lorain, Ohio, USA. On 25th March 1942, at a dance for the US servicemen held at Purdysburn Hospital, Maisie and Ernest met for the first time where they danced to songs by Glen Miller, Tommy Dorsey and Frank Sinatra. 🎼💃🏼

On 2nd March 1943, a year to the day after Ernest’s arrival in Belfast, he and Maisie wed at Dundonald Presbyterian Church. 👰🏻🤵🏻 Maisie and her family had even saved their ration coupons for many weeks beforehand so they could bake a wedding cake.🍰

At the end of the war, Maisie was one of approx. 1,800 women from Northern Ireland that moved to America to be with their husbands and become G.I. Brides. Maisie settled into her new life in Lorain, Ohio with the help and support of G.I. Brides from across the United Kingdom who had also fallen in love and married American soldiers.🌎💘

Maisie and Ernest raised two children who, after their first visit back to Northern Ireland in 1950 returned to the states with Irish accents!

Maisie and Ernest were happily married until Ernest’s passing in 1989. 💕

We would like to thank Marie Nickolette Tench for passing on the story of her mother and father.

If you or anyone else you know has a similar romantic story, or any other memories from the war, we would love to hear from you and have the story added to our collection through our War and Me Oral History Project. 🗣

More details on our Oral History Project can be found by following the link: …/war-oral-history-project/

 

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My Name Is Might Have Been – Holocaust Memorial Day 2019

This year NIWM commemorated Holocaust Memorial Day with an exhibition of paintings by local artist Leslie Nicholl. The series of paintings entitled My Name Is Might Have Been were inspired by the story of Helen Lewis, a Holocaust survivor who settled in Belfast.

The artist inspired by Helen’s book, A Time to Speak, undertook to retrace her journey from Terezin concentration camp to Auschwitz in Poland during a bitterly cold and snowy January and February. Haunted by what he had seen, he later painted faces onto handkerchiefs. The paintings show the faces of people who experiences the Holocaust and have the names of various concentration and death camps printed on them using lead typeface.

The exhibition will be on display until Friday 29th March 2019.

Thank you to those who attended our exhibition launch on Wednesday 23rd January.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-northern-ireland-47008859/holocaust-memorial-day-local-artist-paints-tribute

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Object of the Month – Jan 2019

Object of the Month – January 2019

My Name Is Might Have Been – Holocaust Memorial Day 2019

2019’s first object of the month is this series of 54 stunning oil paintings of Holocaust victims by local artist Leslie Nicholl.

Entitled My Name Is Might Have Been, the paintings show the faces of those who experienced the Holocaust and have the names of various concentration and death camps printed on them using lead typeface. 

The artist, inspired by the story of Helen Lewis, a Holocaust survivor who settled in Belfast, undertook to retrace her journey from Terezin Concentration Camp on the outskirts of Prague to Auschwitz in Poland. Haunted by what he had seen, he later painted faces onto handkerchiefs.

The paintings will be on display at NIWM until 29th March for those wishing to view the series.

In addition, on Wednesday 23rd January 2019, Leslie will be providing an artist’s talk about the paintings and how he was inspired to make them. This will be complemented by readings from Helen Lewis’s book A Time To Speak by international recitalist Frances Mulley.

Places are limited to attend this event, so if you wish to attend please RSVP by contacting info@niwarmemorial.org

https://www.hmd.org.uk/activity/my-name-is-might-have-been/

 

 

 

 

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Wartime Carrot Cake Recipe

Wartime Carrot Cake Recipe

In recognition of #TinCanDay we thought we would share another wartime recipe with you that uses an ingredient stored in a tin can.🥫 Dried eggs first became available in 1942 to supplement the short supply of fresh eggs.🥚

Coming from America, dried eggs came over in tins or packets with each packet containing the equivalent of a dozen fresh eggs.

We would love to hear how you get on if you do end up baking with this recipe. 🍰Remember 1 tsp of dried eggs is the equivalent of 1 fresh egg. Tag us in a picture on any of our Social Media Channels using the hashtag #niwarmemorial. 🎄❄️

Facebook: @NIWarMemorialMuseum / Twitter: @NIWarMemorial

Instagram: @niwarmemorial / Pinterest:@NIWarMemorial

 

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Wartime Christmas Cake Recipe

Wartime Christmas Cake Recipe

If you have ever visited the museum around Christmas you may have been lucky enough to try out our Wartime Christmas cake made using a ration recipe from the Second World War.

We thought it would be fun to share the recipe with you.

We would love to hear how you got on if you do end up making it. Tag us in a picture on any of our Social Media Channels using the hashtag #niwarmemorial. 🎄❄️

Facebook: @NIWarMemorialMuseum / Twitter: @NIWarMemorial

Instagram: @niwarmemorial / Pinterest:@NIWarMemorial

#NIWM #wartimechristmascake #rationrecipe

 

 

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Object of the Month

Object of the Month – December 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ‘Careless Talk Costs Lives’ series was illustrated by Cyril Bird under the alias ‘Fougasse’ who worked unpaid for the Ministry of Information during the Second World War. The images depicted every day situations in which caricatures of leading Nazis such as Hitler, Goering and Goebbels eavesdropped on conversations for sensitive material and intelligence.

The “Careless Talk” Xmas Cards were sold without envelopes in order ‘to save paper and bring victory nearer”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve had an extremely busy 2018 at NIWM and having taken inspiration from these Christmas cards in our collection (NIWM:2018.2161), we’ve decided this need not prevent us wishing all our visitors, friends and supporters a very happy Christmas!

We have plenty of exciting plans for the year ahead already and hope to see you all again in 2019!

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Christmas closing

The museum will close at 2pm on Friday 21st December and reopen on Wednesday 2nd January at 10am.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

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We are closed today- Monday 17th December 2018

Monday 17th December 2018

The museum is closed today due to unforeseen circumstance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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Object of the month

Object of the month – November 2018

 

With the onset of winter and the nights drawing in, it’s important that your vehicle is prepared for the changing driving conditions. But spare a thought for those drivers during the Second World War who also had to contend with the blackout regulations. Initially the blackout had an alarming effect; the number of accidents increased and the number of deaths on the road doubled!

The regulations were changed, and cars were permitted to drive with dipped headlights provided they had a headlight mask such as this one from the NIWM collection (NIWM:2016.2172). The three-slot headlight mask was released towards the end of September 1939 and was eventually made compulsory on 22nd January 1940. It was to be placed over the headlight, replacing the glass and limiting the light that could be seen from above.

Despite being introduced to help ensure people’s safety, there are many examples of the blackout and other Air Raid Precautions being treated with indifference in Northern Ireland. Some dismissed the blackout as ‘a political stunt’ and stated they would rather ‘run the risk of bombs falling nearby rather than live for the duration [of the war] in rooms that remind [her] of a dungeon’. It was even highlighted on 10th April, 1941 (two days after the first raid on Belfast and five days before the Easter Tuesday Raid) that the lighthouses in Belfast Lough were still functioning as in peacetime.

There was a widespread belief that Belfast would not be bombed by the Luftwaffe which was sadly to be disproved over the course of April and May 1941.

 

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Object of the month

Object of the month – October 2018

 

On the 29th October 1963, 55 years ago the War Memorial Building on Waring Street was officially opened by the Queen Mother and so it is only fitting that October’s Object of the Month marks the occasion.

 

The idea for the building originated in two separate funding appeals ran by the British Legion in Northern Ireland and the Parliament of Northern Ireland at Stormont. In 1947 the Legion appeal merged into the Northern Ireland War Memorial Building Fund and the NI Government pledged to match every £1 raised up to £100,000.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The offices of the NI War Memorial Building Fund were based in three converted tramcarsin an area destroyed by the Belfast Blitz in 1941 called Blitzed Square on High Street, Belfast.

 

 

 

Various appeals such as the ‘Odd Shillings and Pence Appeal’ at Christmas 1948 (pictured) and a ‘Torch of Remembrance Appeal’ were launched to raise the funds required for the building.

 

 

 

 

However it was not until 1963 that enough money was raised and the building completed. Pictured is a copy of the order of events for the opening ceremony on 29th October 1963.

 

 

 

In 2008 the NI War Memorial including the memorials, objects and artworks such as this stained glass window by Stanley Murray Scott relocated to it’s current location on Talbot Street, Belfast. As an accredited museum, the NI War Memorial has a thriving learning programme, an ever-growing collection and continues to provide accommodation for ex-service charities and act as a memorial to those from Northern Ireland who were killed in both the First and Second World Wars.

 

 

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